Can you identify this old embroidery/weaving?

Can you identify this?

I bought it back in the 1970s from an antique shop in Jacksonville, FL. This was one of my first purchases and I fell in love with it without having any idea of its origin or subject.

This was an old piece then, and of course it’s aged in the years since.

It looks as if it’s made with silk threads and is a hand sewn piece. There is no dragon, though it gives the sense of St. George slaying the dragon, so I’ve always dubbed it my St. George tapestry. It’s a squarish piece and nowhere near the size of a true tapestry (18″x18″).  There is a definite Eastern air to it. I have not been able to find its duplicate online and would love to have a name for it and country of origin. Dating it is also important. Here are some close-ups. You can click on each to bring up the full size photo.

And here’s a look at the reverse…

Any ideas about its origin, subject or time period are most welcome!

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5 thoughts on “Can you identify this old embroidery/weaving?

  1. looks more woven than embroidered

    I would also suggest that the face is more like alexander the great (shown on his horse bucephalas) he’s known in turkish legend as Iskander and they often depict him in eastern attire

  2. Thanks for those details! I’ll definitely expand my research toward Alexander. Do you think it’s of Turkish origin?

  3. My 2 cents worth. Look for this scene to be from a much larger, more complex tapestry. Many times, tapestry artest copuied images from larger wall hangings. It appears Moorish, Arabic in terms of style and clothing.

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